janedoe225:

On April 22, 16-year-old Kiera Wilmot was arrested at her Polk County high school for conducting a routine science experiment. No one was hurt and there was no property damage. The teen, who has no criminal history and maintained good grades, suddenly found herself trapped in Florida’s insidious school to prison pipeline; which has continually funneled primarily youth of color out of Florida’s schools and into the criminal justice system.TAKE ACTION to ensure Kiera does not become another casualty of the school to prison pipeline.Sign the petition: http://signon.org/sign/superintendent-stewartSpread the word!

janedoe225:

On April 22, 16-year-old Kiera Wilmot was arrested at her Polk County high school for conducting a routine science experiment. No one was hurt and there was no property damage. The teen, who has no criminal history and maintained good grades, suddenly found herself trapped in Florida’s insidious school to prison pipeline; which has continually funneled primarily youth of color out of Florida’s schools and into the criminal justice system.

TAKE ACTION to ensure Kiera does not become another casualty of the school to prison pipeline.

Sign the petition: http://signon.org/sign/superintendent-stewart

Spread the word!

Posted by comradeclaudia

14 notes

jonathan-cunningham:

chos:

fakeagainstthemachine:


You might think you can peaceably assemble to petition the government  for a redress of grievances. You might think the police are your 99%  buddies. But when it comes down to it, they are there to gas you and  crack your skull if your presence becomes too much of a nuisance.

- Matt Bors

Can you imagine if another country did this? What would the US say to them?

Depends- are they oil rich and is the despot controlling them US friendly?

jonathan-cunningham:

chos:

fakeagainstthemachine:

You might think you can peaceably assemble to petition the government for a redress of grievances. You might think the police are your 99% buddies. But when it comes down to it, they are there to gas you and crack your skull if your presence becomes too much of a nuisance.

- Matt Bors

Can you imagine if another country did this? What would the US say to them?

Depends- are they oil rich and is the despot controlling them US friendly?

Posted by comradeclaudia

262 notes

glynnthomas:

“Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate.”- Bertrand Russell

glynnthomas:

“Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate.”
- Bertrand Russell

(via taoistsoul-deactivated20110916)

Posted by comradeclaudia

307 notes

deafmuslimpunk:

EXLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH CARLOS LATUFF (One of the most outspoken political cartoonists who advocates human rights for Palestinians)
Middle East Monitor (Aug 1, 2011)
Carlos Latuff is a Brazilian artist whose vibrant political cartoons  have made him an inspirational advocate for the people of Palestine,  Iraq, Afghanistan and beyond. He uses his expressive art to expose  injustices around the world including war crimes, apartheid,  imperialism, exploitation, the dark underbelly of capitalism and other  forms of oppression around the world. The most frequent targets for his  derision are the governments of the USA and Israel, and he does not shy  away from highlighting their roles in exploiting and oppressing innocent  people, whether in Iraq, Palestine, Afghanistan or anywhere else. They  say that a picture tells a thousand words and Latuff’s cartoons  certainly do that. He is lauded among political activists and oppressed  people who feel he is championing their human rights through his art but  he is also the subject of vilification by others - primarily those his  art criticises. One of the most inspiring and controversial political  cartoonists of our time, Carlos Latuff agreed to talk to MEMO about his  art, what inspires his drawings and what it all means to him.

Dr. Hanan Cheata: Your art is clearly driven by your  strong sense of justice and your personal opinions on issues such as  Imperialism, capitalism, war, human rights violations and so on. Have  you always been politically minded or was there a particular event or  person that inspired you to become so politically engaged?
Carlos Latuff: I believe that working for a Leftist  trade union paper for so long (since 1990) has an impact on my views. I  learned the meaning of solidarity with the Leftists.
HC: You were born and raised in Rio de Janero in  Brazil but have Lebanese ancestry. How far do you think your Arab roots  have influenced your world view and your art?
CL: I think no influence at all. I didn’t know my  grandfather, he passed away before I could meet him. It’s a matter of  internationalism, as Che Guevara used to say. Solidarity with ALL people  in the world. But I must say that since my visit to the Occupied  Territories of the West Bank I feel attached to Palestine AND the Middle  East.
HC: You visited Palestine in the late 1990’s.  What is your most enduring memory of your visit there and did that  experience change your view on the Palestine-Israel conflict in any way?
CL: What really caught my attention is the enormous  difficulties faced by Palestinians under Israeli apartheid, and how they  are strong and courageous enough to fight the occupation.
HC: You’ve been blacklisted by Israel and are  therefore banned from visiting the Occupied Palestinian Territories  again. This in itself surely reaffirms how powerful your images are if a  country is willing to ban you on the grounds of your art? How do you  feel about this ban?
CL: I fell into the same category of Palestinians in  exile, denied entry to Palestine. Sometimes I feel myself a bit  Palestinian. I take this ban as a compliment.
HC: You certainly do not shy away from  controversy. No topic seems off limits to you but as a result you have  become a target, receiving hate mail, on-line abuse and even, on  occasion, death threats. Has the personal price you have had to pay for  your art been worth it?
CL: Smear campaigns and death threats is nothing compared to what Palestinians have to endure. So it’s OK for me.
HC: You’ve been accused of anti-Semitism in the  past, a slur levelled against many who speak out against the Israeli  state. Have such accusations made you more cautious with your art?
CL: No way! These continuous allegations of  anti-Semitism against my cartoons, against Palestinian solidarity  activists, boycott campaigns, it’s all related to a well-known strategy  of the Zionist lobby in order to silence criticism against Israel.

HC: In a previous interview, when discussing  censorship, which is a focus of many of your drawings, you say that if  one site bans your pictures, it appears on ten others and that “the web  is the theatre for virtual guerrilla tactics”. How important has the  internet been in getting your message out to the world?
CL: Without the Internet I could only rely on the  mainstream media to spread my artwork and opinions. Now with the  Internet I can share my cartoons to all the corners of the world.  Without the Internet you would never know about me :)
HC: What is your view of freedom of expression and art? Is there anything that should be entirely off limits?
CL: Respect, that’s everything we need to have in  mind. There’s a BIG difference between criticism and attack. The  cartoons about Mohammed, for example, are pure hatred against Muslims,  it’s not about criticism or freedom of speech.
HC: You encourage people to  distribute your art for free and you do not copyright your material.  This seems to reaffirm your anti-capitalist stance. It feels as though  your art is intended to be a gift to the oppressed people you draw  about. Is this how you feel about it?
CL: The artwork I make for Palestinians, Egyptians  and other causes is not professional; it’s an exercise of solidarity. I  need for these cartoons reach a large audience because they have a  message to deliver that is different from those you see in the  mainstream media.
HC: One of the wonderful things about art is the  way it transcends barriers of language, race, class and anything else.  Your art has been viewed all around the world. Where is your art most  well and least well received? For instance, given that American foreign  policy is frequently the subject of criticism in your work, has your art  been well received there?
CL: The oppressed are those who welcome my cartoons. The oppressors don’t.
HC: Of all of your political cartoons do you have a favourite one and if so why?
CL: The “We are all Palestinians” series where I compare the suffering of Palestinians with that of others throughout history.
HC: Do you plan to continue with this type of  work for the foreseeable future or do you have something different  planned for the next few years?
CL: The only plan I have is to make something useful for people’s struggles everywhere.
LATUFF ON THE WEB:http://latuff2.deviantart.com/http://tales-of-iraq-war.blogspot.com/http://artintifada.wordpress.com/2009/01/10/latuff-palestine-cartoons/

deafmuslimpunk:

EXLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH CARLOS LATUFF (One of the most outspoken political cartoonists who advocates human rights for Palestinians)

Middle East Monitor (Aug 1, 2011)

Carlos Latuff is a Brazilian artist whose vibrant political cartoons have made him an inspirational advocate for the people of Palestine, Iraq, Afghanistan and beyond. He uses his expressive art to expose injustices around the world including war crimes, apartheid, imperialism, exploitation, the dark underbelly of capitalism and other forms of oppression around the world. The most frequent targets for his derision are the governments of the USA and Israel, and he does not shy away from highlighting their roles in exploiting and oppressing innocent people, whether in Iraq, Palestine, Afghanistan or anywhere else. They say that a picture tells a thousand words and Latuff’s cartoons certainly do that. He is lauded among political activists and oppressed people who feel he is championing their human rights through his art but he is also the subject of vilification by others - primarily those his art criticises. One of the most inspiring and controversial political cartoonists of our time, Carlos Latuff agreed to talk to MEMO about his art, what inspires his drawings and what it all means to him.

Dr. Hanan Cheata: Your art is clearly driven by your strong sense of justice and your personal opinions on issues such as Imperialism, capitalism, war, human rights violations and so on. Have you always been politically minded or was there a particular event or person that inspired you to become so politically engaged?

Carlos Latuff: I believe that working for a Leftist trade union paper for so long (since 1990) has an impact on my views. I learned the meaning of solidarity with the Leftists.


HC:
You were born and raised in Rio de Janero in Brazil but have Lebanese ancestry. How far do you think your Arab roots have influenced your world view and your art?

CL: I think no influence at all. I didn’t know my grandfather, he passed away before I could meet him. It’s a matter of internationalism, as Che Guevara used to say. Solidarity with ALL people in the world. But I must say that since my visit to the Occupied Territories of the West Bank I feel attached to Palestine AND the Middle East.


HC:
You visited Palestine in the late 1990’s. What is your most enduring memory of your visit there and did that experience change your view on the Palestine-Israel conflict in any way?

CL: What really caught my attention is the enormous difficulties faced by Palestinians under Israeli apartheid, and how they are strong and courageous enough to fight the occupation.

HC: You’ve been blacklisted by Israel and are therefore banned from visiting the Occupied Palestinian Territories again. This in itself surely reaffirms how powerful your images are if a country is willing to ban you on the grounds of your art? How do you feel about this ban?

CL: I fell into the same category of Palestinians in exile, denied entry to Palestine. Sometimes I feel myself a bit Palestinian. I take this ban as a compliment.


HC:
You certainly do not shy away from controversy. No topic seems off limits to you but as a result you have become a target, receiving hate mail, on-line abuse and even, on occasion, death threats. Has the personal price you have had to pay for your art been worth it?

CL: Smear campaigns and death threats is nothing compared to what Palestinians have to endure. So it’s OK for me.


HC:
You’ve been accused of anti-Semitism in the past, a slur levelled against many who speak out against the Israeli state. Have such accusations made you more cautious with your art?

CL: No way! These continuous allegations of anti-Semitism against my cartoons, against Palestinian solidarity activists, boycott campaigns, it’s all related to a well-known strategy of the Zionist lobby in order to silence criticism against Israel.


HC:
In a previous interview, when discussing censorship, which is a focus of many of your drawings, you say that if one site bans your pictures, it appears on ten others and that “the web is the theatre for virtual guerrilla tactics”. How important has the internet been in getting your message out to the world?

CL: Without the Internet I could only rely on the mainstream media to spread my artwork and opinions. Now with the Internet I can share my cartoons to all the corners of the world. Without the Internet you would never know about me :)


HC:
What is your view of freedom of expression and art? Is there anything that should be entirely off limits?

CL: Respect, that’s everything we need to have in mind. There’s a BIG difference between criticism and attack. The cartoons about Mohammed, for example, are pure hatred against Muslims, it’s not about criticism or freedom of speech.


HC: You encourage people to distribute your art for free and you do not copyright your material. This seems to reaffirm your anti-capitalist stance. It feels as though your art is intended to be a gift to the oppressed people you draw about. Is this how you feel about it?

CL: The artwork I make for Palestinians, Egyptians and other causes is not professional; it’s an exercise of solidarity. I need for these cartoons reach a large audience because they have a message to deliver that is different from those you see in the mainstream media.


HC:
One of the wonderful things about art is the way it transcends barriers of language, race, class and anything else. Your art has been viewed all around the world. Where is your art most well and least well received? For instance, given that American foreign policy is frequently the subject of criticism in your work, has your art been well received there?

CL: The oppressed are those who welcome my cartoons. The oppressors don’t.


HC:
Of all of your political cartoons do you have a favourite one and if so why?

CL: The “We are all Palestinians” series where I compare the suffering of Palestinians with that of others throughout history.


HC:
Do you plan to continue with this type of work for the foreseeable future or do you have something different planned for the next few years?

CL: The only plan I have is to make something useful for people’s struggles everywhere.

LATUFF ON THE WEB:
http://latuff2.deviantart.com/
http://tales-of-iraq-war.blogspot.com/
http://artintifada.wordpress.com/2009/01/10/latuff-palestine-cartoons/

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

Posted by comradeclaudia

35 notes

maced:


A Somali woman weeps for her dead child at Banadir hospital in Mogadishu, on July 21, 2011. (Reuters/Feisal Omar) [x]

“With East Africa facing its worst drought in 60 years, affecting more than 11 million people, the United Nations has declared a famine in the region for the first time in a generation. Overcrowded refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia are receiving some 3,000 new refugees every day, as families flee from famine-stricken and war-torn areas. The meager food and water that used to support millions in the Horn of Africa is disappearing rapidly, and families strong enough to flee for survival must travel up to a hundred miles, often on foot, hoping to make it to a refugee center, seeking food and aid. Many do not survive the trip. Officials warn that 800,000 children could die of malnutrition across the East African nations of Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Kenya. “
Donate money through these organizations:
UNICEF — money will help provide therapeutic treatment for women and children with severe malnutrition, access to clean drinking water and vaccinations to prevent deadly diseases like measles and polio (you can text “FOOD” to 864233 to donate $10 from the United States)
International Medical Corps — provide food, water, hygiene, sanitation and mental health services to people in refugee camps in Somalia, Ethiopia, and Kenya (you can text “AFRICA” to 80888 to donate $10 to the group’s drought relief response from the United States)
International Rescue Committee — giving cash and other assistance to families whose livestock, pastures and farmland have been decimated and helping to repair boreholes and wells for those left behind in Somalia; establishing reception centers in Kenyan camps for newcomers to receive food, health screenings, and medical referrals; and bringing water and installing water-supply systems in three camps in Ethiopia, which serve 82,000 refugees.
United Nations World Food Programme — plans to airlift high energy biscuits and highly nutritious supplementary foods for children and pregnant or nursing mothers into southern Somalia (to donate $10 from the United States, text “AID” to 27722; to donate $5 from Canada, text “RELIEF” to 45678; to donate £3 from the United Kingdom text “AID” to 70303)
Oxfam — providing life-saving water, sanitation services, food and money. The organization aims to reach 3 million people, including 700,000 in Ethiopia, 1.3 million in Kenya, and 500,000 in Somalia
Save the Children —  feeding underweight children, providing life-saving medical treatment, and getting clean water to remote communities in Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia (text “SURVIVE” to 20222 to donate $10 from the United States to Save the Children’s East Africa Drought and Food Crisis)
others listed here

maced:

A Somali woman weeps for her dead child at Banadir hospital in Mogadishu, on July 21, 2011. (Reuters/Feisal Omar) [x]

“With East Africa facing its worst drought in 60 years, affecting more than 11 million people, the United Nations has declared a famine in the region for the first time in a generation. Overcrowded refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia are receiving some 3,000 new refugees every day, as families flee from famine-stricken and war-torn areas. The meager food and water that used to support millions in the Horn of Africa is disappearing rapidly, and families strong enough to flee for survival must travel up to a hundred miles, often on foot, hoping to make it to a refugee center, seeking food and aid. Many do not survive the trip. Officials warn that 800,000 children could die of malnutrition across the East African nations of Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Kenya. “

Donate money through these organizations:

  • UNICEFmoney will help provide therapeutic treatment for women and children with severe malnutrition, access to clean drinking water and vaccinations to prevent deadly diseases like measles and polio (you can text “FOOD” to 864233 to donate $10 from the United States)
  • International Medical Corpsprovide food, water, hygiene, sanitation and mental health services to people in refugee camps in Somalia, Ethiopia, and Kenya (you can text “AFRICA” to 80888 to donate $10 to the group’s drought relief response from the United States)
  • International Rescue Committeegiving cash and other assistance to families whose livestock, pastures and farmland have been decimated and helping to repair boreholes and wells for those left behind in Somalia; establishing reception centers in Kenyan camps for newcomers to receive food, health screenings, and medical referrals; and bringing water and installing water-supply systems in three camps in Ethiopia, which serve 82,000 refugees.
  • United Nations World Food Programmeplans to airlift high energy biscuits and highly nutritious supplementary foods for children and pregnant or nursing mothers into southern Somalia (to donate $10 from the United States, text “AID” to 27722; to donate $5 from Canada, text “RELIEF” to 45678; to donate £3 from the United Kingdom text “AID” to 70303)
  • Oxfamproviding life-saving water, sanitation services, food and money. The organization aims to reach 3 million people, including 700,000 in Ethiopia, 1.3 million in Kenya, and 500,000 in Somalia
  • Save the Children feeding underweight children, providing life-saving medical treatment, and getting clean water to remote communities in Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia (text “SURVIVE” to 20222 to donate $10 from the United States to Save the Children’s East Africa Drought and Food Crisis)
  • others listed here

(via brosephstalin-deactivated201212)

Posted by comradeclaudia

479 notes

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